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Posts Tagged ‘Islamic Art’

As the end of the year approaches our kids often have class parties, where they exchange gifts with their friends. Sometimes I send in toys or books. This craft was an Eid/holidays gift for my daughter’s preschool class. I painted one on canvas for each child in her class, inscribing their names in English and Arabic. MashaAllah the kids were fascinated, seeing their name in another language and hopefully will carry happy memories of a Muslim girl and her mommy for many years to come. Many of the parents appreciated the time and said they would display these in their kids rooms. All praise belongs to Allah.

This kid was half Indian Half African American

You will need ready made canvas available at Micheals or Aaron Brothers

I used acrylics and distressed glitter glue

First paint the background and let it dry before doing the calligraphy. Be as creative as you want. For some I shaded the background.


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Calligraphy of the Declaration of Faith

Teaching the articles of faith, Iman e mufassil to the kids? Have them listen to this beautiful nasheed by Talib Habib.  It will help them learn it easily when sung to this tune. My kids love to hum this rendition of the declaration of faith.

Listen to Articles of Faith

You can buy the album Songs of Innocence and help this brother.

The Lyrics to the Nasheed Articles of Faith

Amantu billahi wa mala’ikatihi
wa kutubihi wa rusulihi wa al-yaum al-akhiri
wa al-qadri khayrihi wa sharrihi min Allah
wa al-ba’si ba`d al-maut, la ilaha illa AllahFaith is belief in Allah and the Messengers
The angels and the Final Day, and the holy scriptures
And to believe in destiny
That good and bad both come from Him
And the Resurrection; there is no god but Allah.La ilaha illa Allah (x3), Muhammad Rasulullah

Allah is the creator of heaven and of earth
Nothing may compare with Him, He is the One alone
The prophets, best of humankind
Sent to all nations and all tribes
Last of all Muhammad, mercy to the worlds.

Formed of light and beauty, the angels of the Lord
To praise Allah, to help mankind,
Jibril brings the word.
The scriptures, all by Allah sent,
Torah, Psalms and Gospel then
The source of perfect guidance, the Glorious Quran.

The reckoning, the Final Day, when all will see their works
Remade in soul and body to stand before the Lord
With patience bearing every grief
With thankfulness for all blessings
We are content with destiny, the Will of Allah.

Faith is belief in Allah and the Messengers
The angels and the Final Day, and the holy scriptures
And to believe in destiny
That good and bad both come from Him
And the Resurrection; there is no god but Allah.

This is for educational purposes only- this is the property and copyrighted by  Brother Talib ul Habib.

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Third Annual South Asian Art Festival

No 1 by Kinda Hibrawl

The Festival will include fine art exhibit, art, fiction and non-fiction book launches by South Asian/ American writers, Poetry Readings, Comedy Show, Art Work Shops for Adults and Children.

May 1, 2010: 1- 7 pm Interactive Gallery tours with artists.

This is what I am really excited about -the Islamic Art workshops especially for kids.

Art workshops (registration upon arrival): Exploring Islamic Patterns and Designs, Endangered species in Sindh and Rajasthan Deserts.

Poetry Reading: 1:30 PM by Beo Zafar, 2:30 PM by Mehnaz Turner

Reception: 4-7 pm Refreshments will be served

Comedy Show May 1, 7-8 pm, May 2, 4-5 pm by Beo Zafar,

All proceeds will benefit

The Citizens Foundation Schools

www.tcfusa.org 501 (c) (3)

Tickets $45.00 online purchase or call 310-459-5826.

www.zanbeelart.com

Trees of Existence_Tree of Light by Halide Salam

Artists participating: Sonia Chaudhary,Pritika Chowdhry, Hayat Gul, Ramesh Gorjala,

Reem Hammad, Abid Hasan, Asad Hussain, Tehniyet Hussain , Wahab Jaffer C.F. John,

Masuma Halai Khwaja, Lubna Lipton,  Bina Malkani, Zahra Malkani,

Amitis Motevalli, Suresh Muthukulam, Murali Nagapuza, Antonio Puri,

Ali Rahamad,  Tara Rashid, Amin Rehman,  Satayakam Saha,

Shakil Saigol, Halide Salam, Natasha Shoro, Azis T.M., Huda Totonji, Farooq Yousufzai.

Ayat by S A Noory

Book Launching: Alive and Well in Pakistan by Ethan Casey

Dust of children by Ali Eteraz

Home Boy by H.M. Naqvi

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders by Danial Mueenuddin

Kolachi Dreams by Nadya A.R.

Rock and Roll Jihad by Salman Ahmad

The Dreamer Awakes, Poems and Paintings by Beo Zafar and Tabinda Chinoy

Art books by Foundation of Modern Museum Art, Pakistan,

Art books by Marg Publications, India

Art books by Sadequain Foundation, San Diego, California.

Sponsored by Zanbeelart

Arena 1 Gallery

Santa Monica Art Studios

3026 Airport Ave.

Santa Monica, CA. 90405

www.santamonicaartstudios.com

310-397-7449, 310-459-5826

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Apparently I live in a city with one of the  most significant collections of Islamic art in the world.  Where have I been?

Silver ornament from Turkish soldier's cap


“These widely diverse arts, from an area extending from southern Spain to Central Asia, trace the distinctive visual imagination of Islamic artists over a period of fourteen hundred years. The collection comprises more than 1,700 works, of which some 150 examples are on view; these include glazed ceramics, inlaid metalwork, enameled glass, carved wood and stone, and manuscript illustration, illumination, and calligraphy. Particular strengths of the collection are glazed pottery and tiles from Iran and Turkey ; glass, especially from the late seventh to the mid-thirteenth century; and Persian and Turkish arts of the book.”

LACMA Acquires Islamic Art – Los Angeles Times

AND guess what I have for you a printable 2 for price of 1 admission coupon to visit the Museum but it expires in April, 2010 so make the trip.  LACMA COUPON

I am planning mine as I write this. Maybe I will have LF#1 do some research before we go there- she is an ‘artist’ Mama.

Geometric Pattern Bowl

Tile

What I am most excited to see is the Aradebil

The lessor known secret Ardabil rug

This is the second “secret” carpet of the pair. Sacrificed to repair its magnificent twin at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Smaller, now borderless, and made up from the remaining usable sections, was sold to American businessmen Clarence Mackay and was exchanged by wealthy buyers for years. “Passing through the Mackay, Yerkes, and De la Mare art collections, it was eventually revealed and shown in 1931 at an exposition in London. American industrialist J. Paul Getty saw it, and bought it from Lord Duveen for approximately $70,000 several years later. Getty was approached by agents on behalf of King Farouk of Egypt who offered $250,000 so that it could be given as a wedding present.

This couplet grace the carpets above the signature-

I have no refuge in this world other than thy threshold
My head has no resting place other than this doorway

-Hafiz


The Ardabil Carpet

“The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is fortunate to possess one of   renowned Persian carpets, the so-called Ardabil Carpet, whose better-known mate hangs in London’s Victoria and Albert Museum.”

I remember visiting the Victoria and Albert Museum as a child, holding my Aboo’s hand as he made sure we understood the history each mystical artifact.  The ‘Arabdil’ was the magic carpet in my 8-year-old eyes.

“Brought to England sometime in the late nineteenth century, the carpets were
reported to have come from the Safavid shrine at Ardabil. There is still a good deal
of speculation about where and for whom such sumptuous court carpets were
commissioned. The outer borders and a section of the lower field were believed to
have been removed from the carpet now in Los Angeles in order to repair the one
now in London. The Los Angeles carpet was subsequently given a new outer
border. Apart from these differences, the two carpets are virtually identical.

According to their dated signatures, this matched pair of carpets were made in1539–40, by a certain Maqsud of Kashan, who may have been the designer who prepared the patterns and oversaw the project; or he may have been the  commissioned the carpets. Predominantly blue, red, and yellow, the overall composition of the carpets—based on a central medallion with  radiating pendants,with quarter medallions repeated in the corners—is ultimately derived from contemporary and earlier bookbinding and manuscript illumination, as is typical of many so-called medallion carpets. The Ardabils, however, include a unique design element in that lamps are depicted projecting from the top and bottom of the central medallion. Medallions and lamps are set against a dense field of flowers that grow from scrolling leafy vines.”
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